Tag Archives: bmx bike

BMX Photography: How-To Take Rad Pictures of your Bike

BMX Bike Photography How-To

If you’ve just completed a new BMX build and you want to get some good shots of it, either just for yourself or in the hopes of getting it shared by a manufacturer, here are some tips.

This how-to is based on the above picture, which I shot for the recent BMX Groms Radocaster 20″ Bike Check.

Find a Good Background

The background can make or break your picture. If the background is busy with a lot of detail it could kill your picture right there. So find a background that complements your bike, without being too distracting. When I wanted to take a shot of the Radocaster, I thought of this graffiti spot next to a local skatepark. I chose the wall, which was predominately green, to complement the red of the Sunday. (Look on a colour wheel and you’ll see that red is opposite green making them complementary colours.)

If the Background is too Busy

The background was really still too busy so I used a lens with a really wide aperture to blur out the graffiti. This helps the bike remain the focus of the picture, setting it apart from the background.

Aperture is the size of the gap letting light into the camera, just like the iris in your eye. A small aperture lets in less light, but allows more of the picture to be in focus, from foreground to background. A large aperture lets in more light, but narrows the area in focus called “depth of field”. The depth of field in the Radocaster picture is so narrow that the pedal closest to the camera is in focus, while the pedal facing the wall is actually slightly out of focus.

The lens I used is an old Nikon 50mm, f1.4, manual focus. The mid to higher end Nikon cameras have awesome compatibility which allows you to use old lenses on a modern camera. This particular lens was manufactured in the 70s, but the quality is still amazing.

Making the Bike Stand Up

This was the easy part. At first I had the bike leaning against the wall, but the graffiti was too distracting and I decided I needed to get the bike away from the wall. So, I found a transparent drink container, put it under the pedal and got the bike balanced in the right place.

Once I got the image on the computer, it was easy to remove the container in Adobe Photoshop with the cloning tool. I just copied some asphalt from elsewhere with a soft brush. Other photo editing software would have similar tool.

Getting your Bike to Stand up for the Picture

Taking the Picture

Remember, fill the picture with what you want to see, in this case the bike. Crop everything else out.

If possible you’ll want the sun behind you somewhere.

Seeing you don’t need a fast shutter speed and you have a wide aperture letting in lots of light, keep your camera’s ISO fairly low to keep the noise down as much as possible.

In most cases avoid the use of a flash as it will probably blow out the shinny areas of your bike and light the image unevenly.

Take a few pictures at different settings, and overexpose and underexpose to get the best picture.

Here are the actual settings I used for this picture: Shutter speed: 1/1600 sec. Aperture: f/1.4; ISO 200. Aperture priority.

Now go out and shoot.

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Nahum Billington 20″ Sunday Radocaster BMX Bike Check

Nahum Billington 20" Sunday Radocaster BMX Bike Check

Nahum Billington is a rad 13 year old BMXer from Canada. Nahum just transitioned from an 18″ to a 20″ Sunday Radocaster build. BMX Groms worked with him to build the bike and document the size change for an upcoming feature on BMX Groms. We used as many parts from the 18″ as possible to help the transition. The 20″ Radocaster frame is a good choice for your first 20″ BMX. The Radocaster frame features excellent quality at an affordable price, which is important when you are still growing and may move up to a larger frame in the future. Learn more about this frame on Sunday Bikes. The 20.5″ top tube length is a good entry point into the 20″ size. For more info on BMX sizing, peek our sizing guide.

BMX Groms build Sunday Radocaster

Nahum Tuck No Hander AirName: Nahum Billington

Age: 13

Height: 5’6

Weight: 135

Riding style (park/street/trails etc.)? Everything I can ride.

How old were you when you started riding? 8

Which size BMX did you start on? 18″

Do you have any advice for kids choosing a bike to start BMX? Choose a bike that fits you, not one you can grow into.

Frame/Top Tube Length: Sunday Radocaster 20.5

Fork: Sunday Octave

Bars/Size: Fit Skyhigh 8.25″

Stem: Shadow Strike Front-load

Grips: Odyssey Tidal

Bar ends: Odyssey

Seatpost: Duo Resilite

Seat: Elat OZ

Cranks (and crank arm length): Sunday Saker 175mm

Sprocket (and number of teeth): Sunday Sabertooth 28 tooth

Sunday Radocaster BMX Groms  20 inch build.

Chain: KMC

Front Tire: Fly Ruben Rampera

Front Wheel: Sunday Lighting

Rear Tire: Fly Ruben Rampera

Rear Wheel: Sunday Lighting

Pedals: Fly Ruben Graphite

Hub Guard: Gsport

Pegs: Gsport

Brakes: N/A

Any special mods? My bars are cut to a custom width, so they aren’t too wide.

Shoutouts or thanks? Huge shout-out and thanks to Sunday and BMX Groms

Sunday Bikes front hub on the Radocaster Build.

Sunday Bikes headtube on the Radocaster Build.

Drivetrain on the Radocaster Build.

Rear hub on the Radocaster Build.

Front view of the Radocaster Build.

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Harry Schofield – 12 Inch Cult Juvi BMX Bike Check

Harry Schofield BMX Bike Check 12 Inch Cult Juvi
Harry is a rad 6 year old grom from Brighton, south east England. We caught up with Harry and did a bike check, just as he was switching from a 12″ to a 16″ BMX. The modifications and upgrades to the 12″ Cult Juvi Harry has been riding are listed. The new Cult Juvi 16″ is stock for now!

Harry Schofield BMX Bike Check 12 Inch Cult Juvi and 16 Inch Cult Juvi

Harry with his 12″ and 16″ Cult Juvi’s at S4P jumps.


Name: Harry Schofield
Age: 6
Height: 123cm / 48.5″
How long have you been riding BMX?: Riding bike no stabilisers: 2yrs 3months. BMX only for about 18 months, as we didn’t used to live close to skate park or BMX track. Learnt most of my skills riding the close we lived in!
Favourite type of riding? (Park, Trails, Street…) Love riding anything and everything as long as its got wheels!
For someone your age, just starting out in BMX, what tips would you have? Be confident, don’t worry what other people think or do, just ride and have fun. The more you ride the better you will get. Pads and helmet important.

Harry Schofield BMX Bike Check 12 Inch Cult Juvi Bars

12″ Bike: Cult Juvi 12″
Spokes: Spokes dt swiss cut down and threaded, originals kept breaking.
Tires: Specialized rhythm tires (stole them off balance bike).
Grips: Can’t find out! Fat and comfy.
Sprocket: Cult Member Sprocket
Pedals: Pedals Wellgo style that I stole off my race BMX bike
Special Mods: Run brake upside on left side and a normal brake instead of the small junior the bike came with to fit my large hands.
The Cult Juvi 12 inch has held up well, the frame is still not broken despite Harry’s insane riding – but lots of scratches. The original headset and bottom bracket have been replaced.
16″ Bike: Cult Juvi 16″

harry-schofield-cult-12-inch-drivetrain

harry-schofield-cult-12-inch-front-wheel

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BMX Groms Official BMX Bike Sizing Guide

What size BMX Bike should I ride?

We’ve tracked some of the raddest BMX Groms in the world, as they’ve progressed, grown and moved from one bike size to another. These are the bike sizes that these shredders are most comfortable riding and if you want to progress like they are, have fun and stay safer – take a serious look at this BMX bike sizing guide.

Thanks to the many kids and parents, who have provided the input to help make this guide possible. One of the number one reasons – maybe the number one reason – for younger riders getting discouraged and quitting BMX, is being bought a bike for them to “grow into”. Get a bike the right size – not one to grow into!

BMX Groms official BMX Bike sizing guide infographic, which answers the question, what size BMX bike should I ride? A 12 inch, 14", 16", 18" or 20"

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Justin Haynes 2015

Lots of sick Park moves and some big street gaps from Justin Haynes. Filmed by Alec Jenkins at Woodstock and Trashmore skate park. Hit play.

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